See something you'd like to change or add, but you've never edited an open encyclopædia before? This overview was written to help absolute beginners get started.

Chronogenealogy

From A Storehouse of Knowledge
Jump to: navigation, search

Etymology:

"Chronogenealogy" is from the Greek χρονος for "time", γενεα for "race, family" and λογος for "word"
A chronogenealogy is a genealogy with chronological information, allowing dates or timespans to be assigned to the people in the genealogy.

A well-known set of chronogenealogies are found in the book of Genesis. For example, the first one in Genesis 5:3-32, which starts as follows:

When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth. After Seth was born, Adam lived 800 years and had other sons and daughters. Altogether, Adam lived 930 years, and then he died.
When Seth had lived 105 years, he became the father of Enosh. And after he became the father of Enosh, Seth lived 807 years and had other sons and daughters. Altogether, Seth lived 912 years, and then he died.
When Enosh had lived 90 years, he became the father of Kenan. And after he became the father of Kenan, Enosh lived 815 years and had other sons and daughters. Altogether, Enosh lived 905 years, and then he died.

Professor James Barr said of the chronogenealogies in Genesis:

Probably, so far as I know, there is no professor of Hebrew or Old Testament at any world-class university who does not believe that the writer(s) of Genesis 1–11 intended to convey to their readers the ideas that ... the figures contained in the Genesis genealogies provided by simple addition a chronology from the beginning of the world up to later stages in the biblical story ... Or, to put it negatively, the apologetic arguments which suppose ... the figures of years not to be chronological ... are not taken seriously by any such professors, as far as I know.[1]

Reference

  1. Barr, James, in a letter from Professor Barr to David C.C. Watson, quoted in Should Genesis be taken literally? by Russell Grigg, Creation, vol. 16 No. 1 p. 38.

External links

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
visitor navigation
contributor navigation
monitoring
Toolbox